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Listed under: “Miscellaneous ”

Chief Diversity Office

About the Chief Diversity Office

Within the Chief Diversity Office, the Diversity Resources Team provides consultation, resource, and skill-building opportunities for University of Iowa faculty, staff, students and guests in order to foster an inclusive, respectful and equitable university community.

Equal Opportunity and Diversity (EOD) implements diversity policies at the University of Iowa and supports the university’s compliance with federal/state laws and regulations and university policies prohibiting discrimination, harassment, retaliation and sexual harassment by or towards any UI community member.

The Center for Diversity and Enrichment (CDE) provides precollege students development assistance with facilitating the enrollment process and provides programs and activities that support the ability of underrepresented student to increase their skills to thrive and succeed at the University of Iowa.

  • Within CDE, the Military and Veteran Student Services provides a resource for utilizing the talents, leadership ability and volunteer power of our veteran and military-affiliated community.
  • CDE also administers the federally funded TRiO Student Support Services and Upward Bound programs.
    • TRiO SSS assists in developing and enhancing student academic skills, connects them to resources on campus and in the community and provides programming, tutoring and a safe space to develop relationships for low-income and first-generation students and/or students with disabilities.
    • TRiO Upward Bound helps first-generation and low-income high school students prepare for college and understand the college-going process.

To learn more about the Chief Diversity Office and its programs, visit the website

Miscellaneous

Dean of Students - Emergency Assistance

About Student Care & Assistance

Student Care & Assistance provides assistance to University of Iowa students experiencing crisis and emergency situations. These situations may include:

  • Hospitalization
  • Medical emergencies or long-term illness
  • Mental health concerns
  • Chronic conditions
  • Death of a family member
  • Natural disasters - fire, tornado, flood
  • Off campus living concerns
  • Unexpected events or challenges

To learn more about the Dean of Students and Student Care & Assistance, visit the website

Miscellaneous

Office of the Sexual Misconduct Response Coordinator

About the Office of the Sexual Misconduct Response Coordinator (OSMRC)

The Office of the Sexual Misconduct Response Coordinator (OSMRC) coordinates the university's response to reports of sexual assault, sexual harassment, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking when those reports involve members of or visitors to the university community. Informed by current federal guidance, the OSMRC aims to ensure university responses promptly and effectively stop problem behavior, prevent its recurrence, and remedy its effects. The office:

  • Provides a central place to report an incident
  • Provides expert advice about university policies and procedures
  • Provides referrals to campus and community confidential resources and victim advocates
  • Facilitates accommodations to address safety concerns and support victims or complainants so academic and professional pursuits may continue unimpeded
  • Coordinates the university's response by working with victims or complainants to ensure their wishes are understood and inform the process
  • and more...

To learn more about OSMRC, visit the website

https://osmrc.uiowa.edu

Miscellaneous

Women's Resource & Action Center

About WRAC

WRAC works to create greater equity for individuals and communities of all identities, with a particular focus on women, through activism, social justice initiatives, leadership training, advocacy, service, and personal and professional development.

WRAC is located at :

Women's Resource & Action Center
Bowman House
230 N. Clinton Street
Iowa City, IA 52242

To learn more, visit the WRAC website

Miscellaneous

RVAP

About RVAP

RVAP is a sexual assault victim advocate and prevention education agency that also hosts the Iowa Sexual Abuse Hotline. We serve anyone impacted by sexual violence -- survivors and/or their loved ones in the following eastern Iowa counties: Cedar, Des Moines, Henry, Iowa, Johnson, Lee, Washington, Van Buren. This includes but is not limited to individuals of any age, gender, identity, culture, etc. 

RVAP's mission is to provide free, confidential, trauma-informed advocacy to all affected by sexual violence and promote social change through prevention education.

For more information, visit RVAP's website.

Miscellaneous

Next Door App

Next Door

Nextdoor is the private social network for your neighborhood.

Nextdoor is the best way to stay in the know about what’s going on in your neighborhood—whether it’s finding a last-minute babysitter, learning about an upcoming block party, or hearing about a rash of car break-ins. There are so many ways our neighbors can help us. We just need an easier way to connect with them.
To learn more about the app, visit Next Door's website

Miscellaneous

Recycling in Iowa City

About Recycling in Iowa City

A blue recycling container is provided for each single-family residence, and each unit of multiple dwelling of four units or fewer. The container is the property of the City and should remain with your home if you move.

Multi-family residences that are five-plex and larger are not served by Iowa City municipal curbside recycling but recycling services are now required to be provided by apartment owners and managers. Please see  https://www.icgov.org/recycling for more information. 

If you are served by Iowa City curbside recycling and need a replacement container, one can be picked up at the City Hall Cashier, 410 E. Washington Street, during normal business hours from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Dropping off recycling

  • East Side Recycling Center, 2401 Scott Boulevard SE (24 hours) 
    Newspaper/magazines/mixed paper/office paper/junk mail/chipboard/telephone books/hard cover and paperback books, corrugated cardboard/cartons and aseptic packaging, glass (clear, brown, green), metal cans, holiday lights (at ReStore's donation area), wine corks (in Oil Recycling Shed or at ReStore)
  • Hy-vee Food Store, 1201 North Dodge Street (24 hours) *Please note that bins have been moved to the north side of the parking lot at the old Hy-Vee location
    Newspaper/magazines/mixed paper/office paper/junk mail/chipboard/telephone books/hard cover and paperback books, glass (clear, brown, green), #1 through #5 and #7 plastics, metal cans, corrugated cardboard/cartons and aseptic packaging
  • Iowa City Landfill and Recycling Center, 3900 Hebl Avenue SW (7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Saturday) 
    Newspaper/magazines/mixed paper/office paper/junk mail/chipboard/telephone books/hard cover and paperback books, corrugated cardboard/cartons and aseptic packaging, glass (clear, brown, green), #1 through #5 and #7 plastics, metal cans, holiday lights (with electronic waste)
  • Coralville Recycling Center, 950 Hughes St. (24 Hours). Paper and Cardboard: newspapers, magazines, mixed paper, office paper, junk mail, chipboard, telephone books, paperback books, corrugated cardboard. Plastics: #1 through #5 and #7 plastics. Metal: metal cans, aluminum pie pans, aluminum foil (in 1-inch ball)

    Visit the City of Coralville website for more information.

 

For more information about recycling, visit the Iowa City website

 

Miscellaneous

Moving In Checklist

Both before and as you move in to your new apartment, there are several important things you should do to protect your rights later on.

Fill out a Move-In Checklist and take pictures

  • You should walk through the entire unit before moving your furniture in, and document any and all damages/problems that you see. It is to your benefit to fill out the Move-In Checklist (PDF Document), make a copy for your records, and provide a copy to your landlord within the first 7 days of the lease term. KEEP A COPY FOR YOUR RECORDS!
  • Take photographs/video of the unit making sure to turn on the date stamp function on your camera. Look for anything that could possibly be described as less than perfectly new and take a picture of it. Then save the photos in-case you need to use them in court.

Utilities

  • Your lease determines your responsibilities for utility activation and payment. Many landlords will pay for the water, but you are usually responsible for all other utilities; gas, electric, telephone, cable, internet, cell phone, etc. Contact the utility companies at least 2 weeks in advance of the move in date.
  • When doing your budget, you not only have to consider your rent each month, but also utility costs on top of that. Generally speaking, the cost of utilities may be the greatest when living alone. If you are sharing an apartment/house, you are also able to share the cost of utility bills. You should spell out how you will share your utility bills in your roommate contract.
  • Utility costs greatly vary. If you are living in an apartment complex versus an older home, the quality of insulation can be quite different. Houses tend to be a larger area of space to heat/cool.
  • Ask tenants that currently live in the apartment complex/house how much they pay for their utility bills on average. Gas, electric and water can vary based on usage. You can call the cable, internet and phone companies to get price quotes for the various packages they offer.

Purchase Renter's Insurance

Get renter’s insurance. Your lease may require you to have Renter’s insurance. Landlords typically have property insurance, but this does not cover your personal property. You want to make sure to have insurance to replace your belongings if they are damaged in a fire or stolen from your apartment, for example.

It tends to be cheaper to add a policy to the same company as your car insurance.. You may also be added to your parent's home owner's insurance (check with their company's policy for details). If either is not an option, it is still inexpensive to purchase renters insurance.

Miscellaneous

Things to Know Before You Sign a Lease

Things to Know Before You Sign a Lease

So you're moving out of the dorms? When making the decision to rent off-campus, one the most important factors to consider is your lease agreement. A lease agreement is a binding contract governing the terms of your residence in the rental property. Notably, these are very difficult to terminate. Private landlords are much less likely to be accommodating to unforeseen situations than University Housing would be.

Lease Agreements

A lease agreement is a binding contract which is very difficult to terminate. Once you sign a lease, you are responsible for the entire monthly rent for the term of the lease. This means that you may have to pay rent for a roommate if that person moves out!

You can have the lease reviewed by Student Legal Services prior to signing.

Tips For Finding Rental Property

Does it comply with the city code? You should first check to see if the rental unit has a valid permit, as well as the maximum occupancy limit. If a unit does not have a valid permit, it is probably due to a health or safety violation. You also want to make sure that only the number of people allowed to live in the unit are on the lease. DO NOT LET LANDLORDS TALK YOU INTO UNAUTHORIZED ROOMMATES AND THEN NOT INCLUDE THEIR NAMES ON THE LEASE.

Permit & Occupancy Information

Iowa City Housing Authority

Look Early

Apartments in Iowa City go fast. The following are good resources for finding available properties and roommates:

  • Rentals, roommates, sublets, furniture, etc.: University of Iowa Off Campus Housing:
  • Websites such as www.craigslist.com and Facebook.
  • Local Newspapers.
  • Bulletin boards postings in grocery stores, laundromats, etc.
  • Friends are often aware of possible vacancies.

Real Cost Of Renting

In addition to the rent, you should account for these additional costs:

  • Gas/electric/water: Contact the utility companies to get the average bill/month
  • Security Deposit (1st & last month’s rent) and Application Fees.
  • Moving expenses
  • Rental insurance
  • Parking
  • Cable T.V./Internet
  • Purchase of furniture, other items
  • Bus stops nearby?
  • Is there adequate security?

Try to talk to the current tenants without the landlord to find out more about the rental unit, utility costs, and reliability of the landlord.

Check out "rate your landlord" websites:

www.apartmentratings.com

www.apartmentreviews.com

www.ratemyapartments.com

WARNING: NEVER RENT A RENTAL UNIT WITHOUT FIRST LOOKING AT THE EXACT UNIT YOU WILL BE RENTING. Some landlords will show a "model" unit which will be in a much better condition than the unit you will actually be renting. Make sure that the address of the unit you are shown is what is shown on the lease agreement.

Miscellaneous

Fall Break: Tips, Safety, Parking

[embed width="800" height="450" class="leftAlone" thumbnail="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/AuYm3X-qkoY/hqdefault.jpg?r"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuYm3X-qkoY&[/embed]

48 Hour Parking Rule

If you're heading away, but your vehicle will stay, refresh yourself on the details of this rule and avoid being towed and fines.

Frozen Pipes

As temperatures take a nose dive, take precautions to keep household pipes from freezing and avoid damage to your home and belongings. 

When the Snow Falls

Ready or not, it'll be here before we know it.  Know what your responsibilities are so that all people have access to your neighborhood's sidewalks for getting around.  Also, learn what to do when the City declares a snow emergency, as on-street parking will be limited to allow plows to fully clear the streets after an extreme winter storm.

SourceIowa City Update - Your source for Iowa City news and information.

Resources for Living Off-Campus Miscellaneous

Tips For Finding An Apartment

General Tips For Finding An Apartment

Start Looking Early: The process for finding apartments starts early. The following are possible resources for finding available properties:

  1. Local Newspapers
  2. University of Iowa Off Campus Housing Listing website. 
  3. Friends or classmates are often aware of possible vacancies.
  4. Bulletin boards in laundromats, etc., may have rental postings.
  5. Websites such as www.craigslist.com and www.facebook.com. However, DO NOT rent or agree to rent a property without seeing it first.

Precautions to keep in mind: NEVER RENT A LIVING UNIT WITHOUT FIRST TOURING THE EXACT UNIT YOU WILL BE RENTING. The amount of rent and other provisions in the lease, as well as the physical condition of the unit are key factors in determining whether to sign a lease. Before you even start looking, you should determine what your housing budget will be and stick to that amount . You do not want to get into a situation where you cannot afford your rent. Be aware of the length of the lease agreement you are signing. Most landlords offer a lease for a full year; in the Iowa City area they typically begin on August 1 and end starting late July. 

When your are looking for an apartment, you should also investigate the reputation of the landlord and manager concerning maintenance, return of security deposits and genera relationships with tenants. Look at the locks on the doors and windows, and the lighting around the apartment to evaluate the security of the apartment against theft. Consider the quality and the age of the construction and insulation as it will affect the cost of heating and cooling: Iowa City generally has hot summers and cold winters. Current and former tenants are good sources of information, as are neighbors. Ask lots of questions when looking at the property, find out what the average utilities are, and go visit the property at night to see if you feel safe in the neighborhood and if the area around the property is well lit. Check out "rate your landlord" websites: www.apartmentratings.com, www.apartmentreviews.com, and www.ratemyapartment.com.

Finally, before you sign a lease, Consider Signing a Roommate Contract

It is extremely important that you and your roommates are clear on your expectations. It is beneficial to all tenants to spell out your individual responsibilities in a roommate contract. By providing written documentation of each roommates responsibilities to each other, a roommate contract can help avoid disputes later on and help ensure that all roommates contribute equally to household tasks and cleaning of the apartment. Fill out your own roommate contract.

Miscellaneous

Renters Insurance

Renters Insurance

If you think renters insurance is not necessary, you are sadly mistaken. Even though you may not own the home, apartment or unit, you do own the property that is inside of the home. If your items are lost or stolen, your home floods or catches on fire, or some other unforeseen accident occurs, you will need to replace those items with your own money. These items are things you purchased over the years, but when disaster strikes, you do not have years to replace your personal property, especially your everyday necessities. It could be really expensive to replace your personal items, which is why you should protect your investments. When it pertains to protecting your personal property, renters insurance is your most affordable option. 

To find out more information about renters insurance, visit The Zebra's website.

For more information on why renters insurance is important, visit the NOLO website

Resources for Moving Out Miscellaneous